Feed on
Posts
Comments

Monthly Archive for June, 2009

Cannon Double-Row Tambourine, 8 Inches

Cannon Double-Row Tambourine, 8 Inches

Why Buy A Cannon Double-Row Tambourine, 8 Inches?
Wooden tambourine with non-tunable organic skin head for the budget-conscious percussionist. The skin head allows percussive taps and thumb rolls; double-row jingles produce thicker, louder textures than single-row jingles. Very lightweight. Excellent for children, beginners, and school use. 2 sizes: 8 with 12 pairs of jingles, and 10 with 16 pairs of jingles.

Customer Reviews & Opinions

Fun and Theraputic!
You will never again say there is nothing to do.

As long as this is within reach you will always have a dependable friend. Sturdy and light and inexpensive.

Wonderful way to introduce someone to music.

After time you will start to notice sound differently.

Especially great for children who are very active.

If you have the passion and energy , go for it.

I learned to play and I knew nothing about how.

Have a good day!!

Get Amazon’s Lowest Price Today!

Other Great Products From Amazon
Dunlop 2-Pack Egg Shaker
Cannon Double-Row Tambourine, 10 Inches
Basic Beat Pair of 8 Combination Rhythm Sticks
Basic Beat Pair of Natural Wood Maracas (with 2 Head)
Hohner Kids Two-Tone Wood Block with Mallet

Read Full Post »

Tipping The Velvet By Sarah Waters

Tipping The Velvet By Sarah Waters

Why Buy A Tipping The Velvet By Sarah Waters?
The heroine of Sarah Waterss audacious first novel knows her destiny, and seems content with it. Her place is in her fathers seaside restaurant, shucking shellfish and stirring soup, singing all the while. Although I didnt long believe the story told to me by Mother–that they had found me as a baby in an oyster-shell, and a greedy customer had almost eaten me for lunch–for eighteen years I never doubted my own oysterish sympathies, never looked far beyond my fathers kitchen for occupation, or for love. At night Nancy Astley often ventures to the nearby music hall, not that she has illusions of being more than an audience member. But the moment she spies a new male impersonator–still something of a curiosity in England circa 1888–her years of innocence come to an end and a life of transformations begins.

Tipping the Velvet, all 472 pages of it, is as saucy, as tantalizing, and as touching as the narrators first encounter with the seductive but shame-ridden Miss Kitty Butler. And at first even Nancys family is thrilled with her gender-bending pal, all but her sister, best friend, and bedmate, Alice, her eyes shining cold and dull, with starlight and suspicion. Not to worry. Soon Nancy and Kitty are off to London, their relationship close though (alas for our heroine) sisterly. We know that bliss will come, and it does, in an exceptionally charged moment. A lesser author would have been content to stop her story there, but Waters has much more in mind for her buttonholing heroine, and for us. In brief, her Everywoman with a sexual difference goes from success onstage to heartbreak to a stint as a male prostitute (necessity truly is the mother of invention) to keeping house for a brother and sister in the Labour movement. And did I mention her long stint as a plaything in the pleasure palace of a rich Sapphist extraordinaire? Diana Lethaby is as cruel as she is carnal, and even the well-concealed Cavendish Ladies Club isnt outré enough for her. Kitting Nancy out in full, elegant drag, she dares the front desk to turn them away. We are here, she mocks, for the sake of the irregular.

Only after some seven years of hard twists and sensual turns does Nancy conclude that a life of sensation is not enough. Still, Tipping the Velvet is so entertaining that readers will wish her sentimental–and hedonistic–education had taken twice as long. –Kerry Fried

Customer Reviews & Opinions

Awesome Book!
I just finished reading this book and I can’t begin to describe how much I enjoyed it. I literally had to force myself to put it down. Sometimes one has to travel through extremes, without really appreciating or understanding, what those extremes are until, when a certain point in life has arrived.

I watched the dvd first, I bought it after watching the Fingersmith on dvd, and I just had to buy the book. Now, I have to watch the dvd AGAIN! Sarah Waters is awesome!

Always a Delight to Reread
I loved this book, a coming-of-age story, a love story, a historical which gave a glimpse to a world I never knew existed.

I actually read this book ages ago, but wanted to give the author a nod right now, today, this very moment.

Why?

Because Amazon’s new rule on sales ranking is horrid, discriminatory, all but bans brilliant books like Ms. Waters’ to the back of the bus.

I wonder what the author thinks about this new rule. It infuriates me beyond belief, Amazon’s lame reasoning for cutting off authors like Ms. Waters, especially after all these years. C’mon, Amazon!

Amazon just lost my sales.

Great Book
I loved everything about this book except the cover art and the fact that it is not available in hardcover. I love the cover art in the limited edition but when I ordered that the seller balked and delivering it and although my money was returned I was not notified until it was too late to reorder it (I wanted it for a plane ride to Taiwan) so I had to settle for the normal edition and pay the exorbitant bookstore price because I needed it in 2 days. Now on to the actual book. This book is a masterpiece however someone like me ( a 22 year old straight male) would not be able to enjoy it with out being called a pervert. This book has amazing character development and for those who think this is a porno book, it is not. There is as much lesbian action as there should be but that is not the focus of the book. This is a great story about a girl growing up in Victorian England and I think anyone who is not repulsed by lesbians should read this book and then check out the movie which is inferior to the book like almost all movies made from books but it’s still great, and to those who are repulsed by lesbians then this book is obviously not for you.

Get Amazon’s Lowest Price Today!

Other Great Products From Amazon
Fingersmith
Affinity
The Night Watch
The Little Stranger
The Help

Read Full Post »

Blu-Ray Suspense And Thriller Bundle (The Usual Suspects / Speed / Phone Booth) – (Amazon.Com Exclusive) [Blu-Ray] Starring Phone Booth, Speed, The Usual Suspects

Blu-Ray Suspense And Thriller Bundle (The Usual Suspects / Speed / Phone Booth) - (Amazon.Com Exclusive) [Blu-Ray] Starring Phone Booth, Speed, The Usual Suspects

Why Buy A Blu-Ray Suspense And Thriller Bundle (The Usual Suspects / Speed / Phone Booth) – (Amazon.Com Exclusive) [Blu-Ray] Starring Phone Booth, Speed, The Usual Suspects?
The Usual Suspects Ever since this convoluted thriller dazzled audiences and critics in 1995 and won an Oscar for Christopher McQuarries twisting screenplay, The Usual Suspects has continued to divide movie lovers into opposite camps. While a lot of people take great pleasure from the movies now-famous central mystery (namely, Who is Keyser Söze?), others arent so easily impressed by a movie thats too enamored of its own cleverness to make much sense. After all, what are we to make of a final scene that renders the entire movie obsolete? Half the fun of The Usual Suspects is the debate it provokes and the sheer pleasure of watching its dynamic cast in action, led (or should we say, misled) by Oscar winner Kevin Spacey as the club-footed con man who recounts the saga of enigmatic Hungarian mobster Keyser Söze. Spaceys in a band of thieves that includes Gabriel Byrne, Stephen Baldwin, Kevin Pollak, and Benicio Del Toro, all gathered in a plot to steal a large shipment of cocaine. The story is told in flashback as a twisted plot being described by Spaceys character to an investigating detective (Chazz Palmintieri), and The Usual Suspects is enjoyable for the way it keeps the viewer guessing right up to its surprise ending. Whether that ending will enhance or extinguish the pleasure is up to each viewer to decide. Even if it ultimately makes little or no sense at all, this is a funny and fiendish thriller, guaranteed to entertain even its vocal detractors. –Jeff Shannon

Speed
Everything clicked in this 1994 action hit, from the premise (a city bus has to keep moving at 50 mph or blow up) to the two leads (the usually inscrutable Keanu Reeves and the cute-as-a-button Sandra Bullock) to the villain (Dennis Hopper in psycho mode) to the director (Jan De Bont, who made this film hit the ground running with an edge-of-your-seat opening sequence on a broken elevator). This is the sort of movie that becomes a prototype for a thousand lesser films (including De Bonts lousy sequel, Speed 2: Cruise Control), but Speed really is a one-of-a-kind experience almost anyone can enjoy. –Tom Keogh

Phone Booth
By some lucky quirk of fate, Phone Booth landed on Hollywoods A-list, but this thriller shouldve been a straight-to-video potboiler directed by its screenwriter, veteran schlockmeister Larry Cohen, whos riffing on his own 1976 thriller God Told Me To. Instead its a pointless reunion for fast-rising star Colin Farrell and his Tigerland director, Joel Schumacher, who employs a multiple-image technique similar to TVs 24 to energize Cohens pulpy plot about an unseen sniper (maliciously voiced by 24s Kiefer Sutherland) who pins his chosen victim (a philandering celebrity publicist played by Farrell) in a Manhattan phone booth, threatening murder if Farrell doesnt confess his sins (including a potential mistress played by Katie Holmes in a thankless role). In a role originally slated for Jim Carrey, Farrell brings vulnerable intensity to his predicament, but Cohens irresistible premise is too thin for even 81 brisk minutes, which is how long Schumacher takes to reach his morally repugnant conclusion. –Jeff Shannon

Get Amazon’s Lowest Price Today!

Other Great Products From Amazon
Iron Man (Ultimate Two-Disc Edition + BD Live) [Blu-ray]
Transformers (Two-Disc Special Edition + BD Live) [Blu-ray]
Batman Begins [Blu-ray]
The Dark Knight (+ Digital Copy and BD Live) [Blu-ray]
Casino Royale (Two-Disc Collectors Edition + BD Live) [Blu-ray]

Read Full Post »

The Wild Bunch [Blu-Ray] Starring William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmond Obrien, Warren Oates

The Wild Bunch [Blu-Ray] Starring William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmond Obrien, Warren Oates

Why Buy A The Wild Bunch [Blu-Ray] Starring William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmond Obrien, Warren Oates?
One of the best action movies ever made, in a cleaned-up print restoring crucial parts of the story. No cavalry ever rode in with more epochal impact than the Wild Bunch in the legendary opening scene. Their steel-eyed leader, Pike (William Holden), and his robbers in stolen army uniforms help an old lady across the street, and then spark a massacre led by Pikes old crony Thornton (Robert Ryan), sprung from jail to hunt down his old gang. In just a few minutes, Sam Peckinpah sets the scene–a dusty Texas town in 1913–sketches a dozen vividly individualized characters, and choreographs one of the most realistic, influential, brilliantly photographed shootouts under the pitiless sun. The cast is superb (even Ernest Borgnine!), the dialog crackling, the bitterly ambiguous moral of the story hard-earned. Its the deeper, dark flip side to 1969s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Consider buying the letterbox Wild Bunch, the review collection Doing It Right, and the Peckinpah bio If They Move… Kill Em! –Tim Appelo

Customer Reviews & Opinions

Steel in the Stone Age
An American original. In my opinion, the finest of any genre.

Acting (actors, all at the pinnacle of their craft), editing, scripting, scoring, cinematography, directing are all combined in the rarest of amalgams. None, standing alone, merit such praise…it is the alloying of all of these elements, fused in a Sonoran blast furnace, forged on an unsentimental western anvil, and tempered on one screen, which made this lustrous substance.

The skill displayed in the opening credits says it all.

BLOODIEST WESTERN! PEKINPAH’S MILESTONE
he Wild Bunch (1969), directed by Sam Peckinpah, is a Western film about an aging outlaw gang at the Texas-Mexico border trying to exist in the modern world of 1913. The film was controversial because of its violence and the portrayal of the crude men trying to survive the era.

The Wild Bunch is noted for intricate, multi-angle editing, using normal and slow motion images, a revolutionary cinema technique in 1969. The writing of Walon Green, Roy N. Sickner, and Sam Peckinpah was nominated for a best-screenplay Academy Award; Jerry Fielding’s music was nominated for Best Original Score; director Peckinpah was nominated for an Outstanding Directorial Achievement award by the Directors Guild of America; and cinematographer Lucien Ballard won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Cinematography.[1]

In 1999, the U.S. National Film Registry selected it for preservation in the Library of Congress as culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant. The Wild Bunch was ranked 80th in the American Film Institute’s best hundred American films, and the 69th most thrilling movie.[2] In 2008, the AFI revealed its “10 Top 10″ of the best ten films in ten genres, The Wild Bunch is the sixth-best western.

Pike Bishop (William Holden), the leader of a gang of aging outlaws, is seeking an elusive retirement with one final score, beginning with the robbery of a bank containing a payload of silver. The group is then ambushed by Deke Thornton (Robert Ryan) — Pike’s former partner — and a posse of deputized bounty hunters hired out by a railroad company, resulting in a bloody shootout that kills off most of the gang; Pike, Dutch Engstrom (Ernest Borgnine), brothers Lyle (Warren Oates) and Tector Gorch (Ben Johnson), and Angel (Jaime Sánchez) emerge as the only survivors. With the loot turning out to be fake, they reunite with another remaining gang member, Freddie Sykes (Edmond O’Brien), and head for Mexico. Deke, who was freed from prison to track down Pike, pursues them for the promise of his freedom.

The gang takes refuge in Angel’s old village, where the Mexican Revolution has evidently taken its toll on the people; a corrupt warlord named Mapache (Emilio Fernández), a General serving under the Mexican Federal Army, had been stealing food from numerous villages to feed his troops. They eventually head to Mapache’s base town — a den of senseless debauchery — to trade horses, but once Angel spots his former girlfriend in the arms of Mapache, he shoots and kills her in the Generalissimo’s lap out of jealousy. To defuse the situation, Pike then decides to work for Mapache, who hires him and his men for $10,000 in gold to steal an arms shipment from a U.S. Army train running near the border; he seeks to resupply his army and appease his German military advisers, who wish to attain some examples of American weaponry to bring home. Angel is eager to send some of the guns to his village, and convinces Pike to let him smuggle some for his share of the gold. The heist goes as planned, but Deke and his posse are waiting for them in the train and give chase, only to be foiled again after falling into an explosives trap that sends the posse down a river. Deke, nonetheless, continues the pursuit.

The gang then devise a careful way to send the guns back to Mapache without risk of betrayal, but during one of their transactions Angel is captured, having been found out for his theft of some of the guns. Later, with Sykes wounded and forced into hiding by another encounter with Deke’s posse, the rest of the gang decide to head back to Mapache for shelter, where they find Angel being badly tortured. Out of a rare moment of conscience, they decide to rescue him. They confront Mapache, who is promptly shot after he slits Angel’s throat. The violent gun battle that follows has Pike and his men killed, but not without a massacre of nearly the entire Mexican garrison.

Deke finally catches up to Pike, only to find his bullet-riddled corpse; he thus allows the remaining posse to take the bodies back and collect the reward, while electing to stay behind and watch Mapache’s base town being abandoned. Sykes later arrives with several rebel partisans from Angel’s village (who had apparently killed off the posse along the way), and asks Deke to fight in the revolution. Laughing, Deke and Sykes ride off together.

Director Sam Peckinpah considered many actors for the Pike Bishop role; originally, the part was written for Lee Marvin, who declined, thinking it too like his role in The Professionals (1966), and he was offered more money to make Paint Your Wagon (1969). James Stewart, Gregory Peck and Charlton Heston were considered before William Holden.[5][6]

The part of Deke Thornton originally was offered to Brian Keith (who had worked with Peckinpah on The Westerner [1960] and The Deadly Companions [1961]). Keith, working in Family Affair, declined; also considered were Richard Harris, Arthur Kennedy, Henry Fonda, Ben Johnson (later cast as Tector Gorch) and Van Heflin. Robert Ryan was cast per his performance in The Dirty Dozen.[7]

Mario Adorf was considered for the part of Mapache; the role went to Emilio Fernandez, the Mexican film director and actor and friend of Peckinpah.[8] Among those considered to play Dutch Engstrom were Steve McQueen, George Peppard, Jim Brown, Alex Cord, Robert Culp, Sammy Davis, Jr., Charles Bronson and Richard Jaeckel. Ernest Borgnine was cast per his performance in The Dirty Dozen.[9]

Robert Blake was the original choice to play Angel, but he asked too much money, per his success with In Cold Blood (1967). Peckinpah had seen Jaime Sánchez in the Broadway production of Sidney Lumet’s The Pawnbroker, was impressed and demanded he be cast as Angel.[10] Albert Dekker, a stage actor, was cast as Harrigan, the railroad detective. He died months after filming, The Wild Bunch was his final film.

Bo Hopkins played the part of Clarence “Crazy” Lee.

In 1967, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts producers Kenneth Hyman and Phil Feldman were interested in having Sam Peckinpah rewrite and direct an adventure film called The Diamond Story. A professional outcast due to the production difficulties of his previous film Major Dundee (1965) and his firing from the set of The Cincinnati Kid (1965), Peckinpah’s stock had improved following his critically acclaimed work on the television film Noon Wine (1966). An alternative screenplay available at the studio was The Wild Bunch, written by Roy Sickner and Walon Green. At the time, William Goldman’s screenplay Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid had recently been purchased by 20th Century Fox. It was quickly decided that The Wild Bunch, which had several similarities to Goldman’s work, would be produced in order to beat Butch Cassidy to the theaters.[11][12][13][14]

By the fa

3.5 stars out of 4
The Bottom Line:

Marred only (and slightly at that) by its unwillingness to develop most of its supporting characters (Warren Oates and Ben Johnson, in particular, come across as empty shirts), The Wild Bunch is a pulsating, red-blooded revisionist Western with exquisite direction by Peckinpah and some of the best-choreographed violence ever seen on screen: if you haven’t yet seen it, make time for The Wild Bunch.

One of the “Top 10″ Westerns of all-time!
“The Wild Bunch” deserves to be considered one of the “Top 10 GREATEST” western films ever made. It’s a CLASSIC of the western genre. The four leading actors are four of the GREATS. William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates. Robert Ryan and Strother Martin are excellent as well.

Sam Peckinpah’s direction is MASTERFUL. The one thing everybody seems to think of when they think of this film is the very violent gun battle at the end. But this is just a small part of the movie. The entire movie is GREAT.

I recommend this movie highly and like I said, it’s one of the CLASSICS of the western genre.

“If any of them move, KILL ‘EM!”

The Wild Bunch is Still Wild
I saw The Wild Bunch when it was first in the theaters. The scale of the large screen almost made the scale of violence of the movie to hard to take. But there are so many underlying themes and images that I find myself drawn back to it over and over again. This DVD version, with all the special features and using the director’s original cut, brings those underlying ideas out into the open.

The first couple of times watching the film I focused on the physical violence — the number of bodies and blood. Even though there are gallons of blood, it is still understated from reality. Bullets go through bodies and blood follows, but we do not have to sit through the additional tearing of flesh that a 45 would do. After seeing the physical, I began to see the psychological. There definitely are some sick and perverted characters, but it is the seemingly sane ones that bother me. William Holden is so calm (and his hero image from other films carries over to this one) that it is hard to believe that he is the mastermind behind the crime. Robert Ryan is trapped into leading the posse, but he also seems entirely out of place. At least Ryan finds an appropriate place in life at the end.

The end itself, with the peasants collecting things left from the massacre contrasts with the perverse body robbing of Ryan’s posse.

Perhaps one of the most telling scenes in the movie is the kids putting a scorpion on an ant hill and enjoying the torment the scorpion goes through. They take even greater delight by setting all the insects on fire. That scene is really a summation of the whole film.

The Wild Bunch takes a strong stomach to watch, but it says so much about human nature that it forces us all to think about who and what we are. A simple comment on it: one of the most compelling films ever made.

Get Amazon’s Lowest Price Today!

Other Great Products From Amazon
The Searchers [Blu-ray]
Unforgiven [Blu-ray]
Rio Bravo [Blu-ray]
The Dirty Dozen [Blu-ray]
Bullitt [Blu-ray]

Read Full Post »

Lenovo 3000 G530 4446 – P T3400 / 2.16 Ghz – Ram 2 Gb – Hdd 160 Gb – Dvd-Writer – Gma 4500M – Wlan : 802.11B/G – Vista Home Basic – 15.4 Widescreen Tft 1280 X 800 ( Wxga ) Vibrantview – Camera

Lenovo 3000 G530 4446 - P T3400 / 2.16 Ghz - Ram 2 Gb - Hdd 160 Gb - Dvd-Writer - Gma 4500M - Wlan : 802.11B/G - Vista Home Basic - 15.4 Widescreen Tft 1280 X 800 ( Wxga ) Vibrantview - Camera

Get Amazon’s Lowest Price Today!

Other Great Products From Amazon
Targus TCM004US Messenger 15.4 Notebook Case
Microsoft Wireless Notebook Optical Mouse 3000 – Slate
Linksys WRT54G2 Wireless-G Broadband Router
Targus CVR217 Neoprene Slip Case for 17 Notebooks (Black/Blue)
Toshiba Satellite L305-S5924 15.4-Inch Laptop

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »